Potted bulbs and gardening

 

 

December 20th -Potted bulbs and gardening

Paperwhites for Christmas with glass baubles from Sarah Raven. It’s a Country Gate tradition – even though there are bags of tulips in the garden shed which still need planting, a million leaves blowing around the garden which need to be bagged to make leaf mould and sweet peas to sow in the greenhouse. If it ever stops raining, I will get out in the garden for a green workout as an antidote to the mince pies!

A Circle of Love

December 19th – Christmas wreaths made with love

Some years I’ve made my own wreath from homegrown apples and chillis; sometimes a simple holly ring; I even contemplated fashioning one from Brussels Sprouts when we had an abundance; last year it was made by a student on a horticultural therapy project; and then there was the year our super special wreath made by Sara Willman, long time friend and one time business partner was stolen from our front door whilst we were having supper in the kitchen. The youngest member of the family spotted it being torn from the door; we gave chase but the thieves were super speedy and Sara, bless her heart, made us another.

Here is this year’s made by Sara. She has created dozens overthe last few wweeks and helped countless others create their own. If you are anywhere near Upavon then check out her workshops and home grown blooms of gorgeousness. It was so lovely to catch up on all her flowery plans for next year over a coffee today as I collected this beauty.

Thanks Sara.

 

When rain stops play…

When you want to spend the day in the garden digging a new herb bed, weeding and potting up the last of the box of dahlia tubers (did I really order that many?) and the nearest you’ll get to it is this brave host of daffs under the trees glimpsed through a rainy car windscreen, I find it hard to rejig my plans. I have a script to work on, rehearsal schedules to organise and schemes of work to finalise for next term. I won’t be idle but I REALLY would prefer to be outside planting these under the hazel near the compost bin.

After weeks of being cooped up in classrooms for the daylight hours getting outside, even for half an hour every day is essential. My heart and mind tell me it’s spring despite the view through the kitchen window. My great grandfather and mother planted potatoes on Good Friday every year. The former was of the generation of farmers who advocated dropping your trousers and placing your bare backside on the ground to test the soil temperature in Spring. I don’t grow potatoes and prefer to use the germination of annual weeds as a reliable indicator that all is warm enough to get sowing but I have oodles of work to do.I guess today is not the day to start in earnest.

 

Plant potions

Calendula salve, an easy make for children
Calendula salve, an easy make for children

Today at The Courts, despite a forecast of torrential rain and thunderstorms we had a lot of fun under the trees making ‘plant potions’. To many children ,particularly those who have experienced the delights of forest schools, plant potions usually means mixing up mud, sticks, leaves and water to make a sludgy brew. It’s great fun. Today however, rather a lot of children and quite a few interested adults went home clutching bags of beautifully scented pot pourri and recipes for comfrey feed, calendula salve and hints and tips for drying flowers, cooking with lavender, how to make dandelion jelly and why nettles are good for you, good for the wildlife in your garden and have dozens of uses. There are a thousand and one useful things that can be made from your flower patch

I promised a few people that I would pop up links to posts I’d included previously. Just click on the appropriate highlighted links above. I also said that I would include the recipe for calendula salve, which is one recommended to me ages ago by permaculturist and all-round good egg Carl Legge. Click on Cally’s Plant Potion Recipes for the recipe sheet we handed out today. Thanks to Jane Ingram for the design.

With a little supervision, even young children can make something useful and which looks professional enough to give as a gift. Calendula is one of those plants which has been used by herbalists since ancient times. It is known to have anti: allergic; inflammatory; microbial and oxidant properties. So it’s perfect for treating cuts and grazes bruises, sores and rashes. We always keep a jar handy in a kitchen drawer.

Calendula is one of my favourite flowers. It looks so jolly, is great for bees, cuts well for the vase and as well as made into a salve it can be eaten in salads or, as my granny used to do, added when making butter to make it beautifully yellow. The seeds are rather quirky too and look almost as though they might crawl out of your hand. They are easy to sow, grow well and self seed prolifically. Children can also collect the seed very easily and pack them up to give away to friends. A perfect addition to any garden, as far as I am concerned.

Tussie mussies, skeps and a bit of garden therapy.

Learning the language of flowers
Learning the language of flowers

I’ve been running summer holiday activities again this year for the National Trust at The Courts, Gardens in Holt. Many of the children who come along are under ten, but it’s a delight to me that many of their parents and grandparents are just as keen to get involved, curious to learn and make something from or for the garden.

Yesterday was no exception.

When I returned from a quick salad and ginger beer lunch at nearby Sam’s Kitchen, a group of ladies were waiting for me eagerly so that they could do a bit of therapeutic tussie mussie making. They even followed the trail around the garden to find out more about the language of flowers.

Neil, who looks after the vegetable garden at The Courts has been bitten by the cut flower growing bug this year and his blooms are a delight, as you see. I’m always happy to share my enthusiasm for cut flowers with everyone and with three buckets of herbs and flowers from my allotment and a bucket of cheery dahlias from Not so Secret Garden at Hartley Farm I did just that.

A tussie mussie is a small posy of flowers and herbs carried by people in Medieval and Tudor times to hide bad smells. They were also thought to protect people form disease – particularly the plague. We used mint, rosemary, bay, lavender or marjoram as the basis for fragrance – although any sweet smelling herb will do. Then we added a couple of flowers with a special meaning, bound the posy with raffia and wrote the message on an attached label.

Both children and adults found the activity highly enjoyable and everyone went away smiling, clutching a posy with a message for someone special.

Flowers seem to be appreciated universally and a walk around the gardens at The Courts is always therapeutic.

cut flowers in the veg plot
cut flowers in the veg plot

Cut flowers are good for bees too and last week’s activity shone the spotlight on the bees. Here’s Di, the beekeeper at The Courts telling everyone about her passion.

20150730_150747
Di with some of her bees
Bee friendly
Bee friendly

While the adults listened intently the children and I took part in the’ Bee Friendly Games’, learning about how bees communicate with each other, protect their hives from intruders and make honey. Finally everyone followed the trail of beautifully handcrafted skeps around the arboretum to discover some fascinating bee facts.

And , of course I couldn’t return home without a jar to keep my family happy.

Local honey from Di's bees
Local honey from Di’s bees

Half Term hijinks

a visit to St Pancras
a visit to St Pancras

We’ve had a busy few weeks. I finally managed to plant all the daffodil and allium bulbs I ordered back in the summer; we finished painting the front door and the children’s bedrooms; two school residentials to the Brecon Beacons and the Lake District have been undertaken; large batches of Christmas chutney have been made; I ran an Autumn themed workshop for the National Trust and we managed to fit in an exciting trip to London.

Sarah and I went up on the train for a girly jaunt around my old Bloomsbury and Euston haunts (including bumping into my old PGCE lecturer at the Institute of Education), a visit to the British library, which Sarah has wanted to do for ages and a stay in a hotel complete with posh bubble bath, facemasks and telly in bed! The boys used the car and stayed with the in-laws and visited the poppy installation at the Tower of London.

Spectacular_poppies_Tower_of_London_

We did meet up on Wednesday though – for the main reason for our London trip. The services of the youngest member of the family were required by Radio 4 Extra for a recording of Junior Just a Minute with Nicholas Parsons, Josie Lawrence and Jenny Eclair who were charming and hilarious in equal measure.

Now the children are back at school, Ian is once more trekking round the country, the Christmas cake is in the oven and I am back at work writing materials for the Abington Park Outdoor Classroom Project and Our Flower Patch.

I’ll be writing about the former soon on this blog. In the meantime you can read a bit about Our Flower Patch here in an interview we gave to Michelle Chapman. Incidentally we have a giveaway on the Our Flower Patch blog this week. All you have to do to win the best book I have come across on growing cut flowers at home (Louise Curley’s The Cut Flower Patch) is to leave a comment and subscribe to the blog. Simple!

Messing about with flowers

cally and flowers
with homegrown flowers

It’s been an exhausting and enjoyable week. The entire family have been involved in a production of Jane Eyre at the town’s ancient Tithe Barn. The eldest child charmed the punters front of house and ate his own weight in leftover cake. The middlest nimbly lugged scenery around backstage.  The youngest endured the horrors of Lowood School and after a quick costume change reappeared as Betsy, a rosy cheeked country girl.  The man of the house  appeared dripping in stage blood as the ineffectual brother of the madwoman in the attic and I provided comic relief when life was looking a bit drear at Thornfield Hall (and a passable Gloucestershire accent).

Production week starts with the get in during the Friday and Saturday prior to production opening, when we move in the set which has been constructed like a giant piece of flat pack furniture elsewhere in our barn, over the previous months along with the lighting rig, set furniture, props, costumes and front of house kit. Experience tells me this is best done in rigger boots and not flip flops when you are the emergency stand in for a your sick son.

Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre July 2014

Then, on Sunday we set up camp for a few hours to run the technical rehearsal, during which time we realise just how little time we have to move between scenes and try to remember our lines and stand in the right place whilst lights are readjusted and carpenters bang in nails around us.This is where the mothers on the cast really come into their own. The ability to block out superfluous sound and get a job done should never be underestimated.

our theatre for one week only - Bradford on Avon's Tithe Barn
our theatre for one week only – Bradford on Avon’s Tithe Barn

From Monday evening onward we’re into the real thing – with a dress rehearsal and a five night run followed by the get out the following Sunday. And all the while doing a full time job in the daytime and getting three very tired children out of bed and off to school in the morning and doing their homework as soon as they get home in the evening. But we love it, despite the fog through which we experience the following week.

Writing has been on hold for a few days as a result but I have enjoyed the calmness and routine of cutting flowers early in the mornings and arranging them for friends and neighbours. I even managed a meadow arrangement for a scene in the production. I love being involved in a project and this production has been an absolute joy but I shall miss working so closely with such a great group of people.

Of course, there’s only one cure for post-production blues and that’s to get involved in the next production. Sadly I am a little too busy at home and work to take that cure so messing about with flowers is a pretty good alternative. I’m harvesting lots of cosmos, nicotiana, cornflowers, salvia, malope, sweet peas, verbena bonariensis, snapdragons, dahlias and lots of foliage this week.

schoolroom flowers
flowers for a Victorian schoolroom

 

 

Flowers, fruit, writing and interviews.

Poppy pavement It’s a bit crazy around Country Gate Towers at present. Obviously, the middlest child is in the midst of Football Fever. The eldest is training hard to protect his position as school javelin champ and the youngest is practising her sprint starts and psyching out the opposition technique ahead of the cluster athletics competition tomorrow. The one sporting an elbow injury is back at work, leaving me free to write activities for Our Flower Patch and Abington Park Outdoor Classroom. In theory, at least. Except I keep being interrupted.

  • There’s the burgeoning flower patch in the garden to watch and keep slug free.
  • There’s the mini quince and plums on the trees we planted last year to admire
  • There’s the excitement of mulberries on our bush on the allotment for the first time ever
  • There’s extra flower orders to pick for and arrange for our growing band of customers at school
  • There’s making the most of endless days of brilliant blue skies and gorgeous sunshine
  • There’s the plantings at the station to admire whenever I get on a train
  • There’s the streets filled with wild poppies which someone secretly sowed back in the Autumn

as well as the inevitable business of family life. I hope life is less busy for you. And if you need something to while away the time while you sit outside and have a coffee, here’s what my partner in Our Flower Patch Sara Willman gets up to during the rest of her week, as reported and photographed by Katie Spicer to celebrate British Flowers Week. My publicity stunt happens this week with an interview with the Guardian about working outdoors, which I do a lot. I’m doing it tomorrow(excitement) followed by a photo shoot on Wednesday (mild panic). When it’s published I’ll let you know….possibly.

Help. I need more space….

Cally's new patch

This cry is nothing new. My family will tell you that I frequently bemoan the lack of space there is in which to store books, propagate plants and stash the paraphenalia of life. However I have  reached the point of not having enough space in which to grow all those plants I started from seed and are ready to pop in the ground. For the first time ever. It’s a disaster! What’s a girl to do?

Get another plot of course!

Better still, get two!

The first is in the garden, where our dear late chickens used to live. We hadn’t got around to re-turfing it and so I suggested to the man I have shared my life with for the past quarter of a century that it would be much better used as a flower patch. In a weak moment he agreed!! I planted it up before he could change his mind and ordered some germander plants from Catherine at Pepperpot Herbs to make a bee- friendly hedge. Job done.

But I still have a lot of seedlings to plant out. I cleared the allotment beds which had been planted with spring bulbs for cutting not knowing where this year’s bulbs would go. On a whim I mentioned this to the staff at the Children’s Centre, where I used to run a ‘Get Growing’ project. The management of the centre has now changed, funding is in decline and their outside space is no longer used. An overgrown plot with three raised beds and potential for more is perfect, isn’t it?

As you see there’s plenty to do, but I’ve made a start by covering the beds with weed suppressant membrane. The next step is to strim the nettles, lay down some more mulch, set up a compost heap and rainwater harvesting and pop in some shrubs which can be used in arrangements.

I feel a weekend working party with coffee and cake and a pot luck lunch coming on.

By the Autumn it should be ready for a job lot of narcissi, tulips, alliums and ranunculus. It’s a gradual transformation. It’ll take time but at least I’ve taken the first few steps.

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