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My children love finding out about the past and for that I am grateful, especially as this means they are more than happy to accompany me on numerous fact finding missions to a variety of heritage sites to see what’s on offer for ‘explorer families’ or school parties.

In the latter part of the summer holidays we stopped by three heritage sites for a brief reccy, packing the picnic hamper and the cricket bat along with a desire to follow the odd trail around house or garden. Doubtless we’ll return in the future to continue our exploration.

All three are  worth a visit which we didn’t have time to do full justice to this summer.  

a whistlestop tour through historical Welsh buildings

a whistlestop tour through historical Welsh buildings

 St Fagan’s National History Museum of Wales is currently undergoing a major revamp funded by the  Heritage Lottery Fund and the Welsh Assembly. Entry is free with the exception of the £4 parking charge and there is enough to keep explorer families like ours happy for a whole day. The staff are friendly and knowledgeable, the historic buildings (rescued and reconstructed on site or built from scratch according to traditional methods) fascinating and the grounds extensive. Definitely one to visit again and again. There’s also an extensive programme for schools.

a stroll around the Essex marshes

a stroll around the Essex marshes

Wat Tyler Country Park (also free to visit) has been developed since last I visited. It too has some traditional Essex buildings, extensive grounds,  rich in biodiversity and history.

A forest school holiday club meets there during the school holidays and there are some organised wildlife based activities on a regular basis too (pond dipping, bug hunting…) On the day we visited it was teeming with young families playing in the playground and on the bouncy castles and enjoying picnics. And these are the ‘bread and butter’ customers who will return again and again to enjoy a few hours in the open air, letting their children run and play.

On the downside, for explorer families with older children the opportunities to engage with the site are few and far between. The advertised exhibition had been dismantled and the Explosives Trail and World War II trail, wherein lies the heritage of the park were little more than a badly photocopied sheet guiding you around an area with little or no interpretation.

We enjoyed the walk nevertheless, talked about Great Expectations and the marshland landscape haunted by Magwitch and stopped off in the reasonably priced cafe for coffee and cake.

 

Roman architectural inspiration and a restored garden

Roman architectural inspiration and extensive grounds

Chiswick House is the perfect stop off point for lunch on our journey from East London to Wiltshire and a favourite haunt of the joggers and dog walkers of West London. The architecture and art of the house itself is well-served by a 45 minute audio tour but the restored gardens have their very own audio tour which is the real gem. 

Not a bad way to spend a few hours during the summer holidays.