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Views in and from the Sky Garden, London

Views in and from the Sky Garden, London

We usually manage to find something free to do with the children when we’re in and around London and last weekend was no exception. A chance remark from someone on Twitter led me to discover the Sky Garden at 20 Fenchurch Streetopen to the public for free, if you book in advance and surrounded by some very swanky eateries.

It was the perfect day for exploring the Square Mile as it coincided with a family cycling event, which meant that most of the roads were closed to motor vehicles and there was a real party atmosphere, with jazz bands playing on street corners whilst we munched our picnic lunch. We combined our visit to the garden with a couple of free trails on the themes of architecture and Dickens (search online), a stroll through the foodie delights of Borough Market and a visit to the Museum of London, stopping off nearby to relax in a peaceful ‘art’ garden where the brave deeds of ordinary people are recorded on simple tile plaques. We shared the space with a group of mums who were enjoying wine and cake under a bunting-festooned tree.

Rather delightfully the building next door to the one housing the sky garden was graced with a living green wall and the Sky Garden itself, topped with a glass dome, not dissimilar in look to a small scale Eden project biodome. Native  Mediterranean and South African planting dominated over the several terraces of the garden (agapanthus, santolina, rosemary…) but it was easy for the children to spot which was the north facing side of the building from the predominance of shade loving ferns on one side of the garden.

The panoramic views over London were spectacular, superior even to those afforded from the London Eye –  and easier to cope with for those who have an anxiety about heights. I’d thoroughly recommend it.

Upminster Smock Mill

Upminster Smock Mill

On the following day we headed out into semi rural Essex to visit the Upminster Smock Mill prior to its closure for an exciting Heritage Lottery-funded restoration project, which will take two years and see the mill restored to its former working glory with the added benefit of a purpose-built education centre on the site. Set in a field in the middle of a residential area of Upminter, it has story which deserves to be told to a much wider audience.

Mr Country Gate had last visited the windmill as a young cub scout and knew that it would fire the imagination of a wife who has spent the last two years telling the story of another heritage site with a rich history and bringing it to the eyes and ears of a young local audience.  Little had changed in the intervening years internally, although the Friends of the Windmill have continued to spread the word about it and fundraise to carry out essential repairs. We were guided around the interior by a friendly and knowledgeable volunteer, spending an enjoyable hour exploring the space, understanding how the machinery worked, discovering the story of the millers who worked it and realising what a truly green, local industry looked like.

It truly is a gem. I shall be following their progress with great interest as they move towards becoming a working mill again. You can follow their progress on Twitter.